Pearl Robison : a restless spirit looking for what’s down the road

47895-Winter-Road

Pearl Robison comes from a fractured family line going back before the Civil War.  And her life resembles a jagged line.  She is related through her father, Jason Jones Robison (1946- ) to Ruby Robison (1843-1933), who was the sister of Marcus Walsh Robison (1936-1897) Pearl’s great-great-great-grandfather.  Ruby was a prostitute in Shreveport who gave birth to a Civil War soldier’s child, the first Pearl Robison.

In 1973 our Pearl was born in Conyers, Georgia but we meet Pearl when she is managing a dollar store in Macon.  One January day, sitting in her car before going opening up she decides to just leave town and head west on U.S. 80.

Snow_and_slush_parking_lot

She ends up in Shreveport, Louisiana, when she stops at an all night diner and Jake McLemore enters her life.  They live together for five years before Pearl’s wanderlust overtakes her again and she leaves again, this time heading for Dallas.  She does not know at the time that she is pregnant, but when she does discover this fact, she does not intend to tell Jake that he is going to be a father.

She gives birth in 2015 to a baby girl whom she names Ruby Robison, after her aunt but also looking back to her prior Shreveport relative, Ruby Robison and Fannin Street.

Levi Motts (1845-1864). Young confederate soldier in love

levi motts

Levi Motts (1845-1864).  Young confederate soldier in love with Ruby Robison.  He fights and dies in Battle of Mansfield, April 8, 1964.

Ancestors:  Randall Motts (1752- 1821); Lucas Motts (1797-1875 ); Luther Motts (1820-1871).

Randall Motts was an Englishman who came to the Colonies in 1782, entering first at Pennsylvania and then making his way across the mountains into Alabama.  He amassed twelve sections of land planted for cotton and became quite wealthy.  His son Lucas headed west and settled in North Louisiana where he found land ideal for growing cotton and created his own large plantation.  Lucas was Levi’s grandfather.

Lucas’s son, Luther Motts, Levi’s father, was something of a ne’er-do-well.  Happy to live off his father’s largesse and not one to get his hands dirty, much less calloused, Luther spent his time playing cards, drinking and visiting the growing number of brothels in the new town of Shreveport.

Levi was nothing like his father and spent most of his time growing up being instructed by his grandfather in the ways of the world and how to conduct himself in business.  However, when the canons fired upon Fort Sumter, Levi volunteered in 1862 to fight in the Rebel cause.  Mustering out of Monroe, Louisiana in Colonel Henry Gray’s brigade, the Louisiana Gray’s, Levi eventually found his way, like his father, to the now quite busy red light district of Shreveport where he met and took up with one of the young sporting girls there, Ruby Robison.

Ruby and Levi defy the conventions of the time and begin a serious relationship with plans of marrying.  However, Levi’s company is called up to fight in the Trans-Mississippi campaign waged by the Union troops who are marching into Louisiana.  Gray’s brigrade is opne of the units in Gen. Robert Taylor’s army confronting Nathaniel Bank’s invading force at Mansfield.

While the Battle of Mansfield is a Confederate victory, Levi Motts is one a about a hundred men who died there on April 8, 1864.  As he goes into battle, Levi knows that Ruby is pregnant with their child, who is born in early 1865, a girl, Pearl who because of her illegitimate status will use the name Robison for most of her life.

Lucas Motts lives to bury both his son and grandson and watching as his the Mott family fortunes are destroyed by the war and Reconstruction.